Tag Archives | Plastics/Polymers

Artifact Labeling 101

Artifact Labeling 101 Source: The Collections Care Alliance A PowerPoint slide presentation on labeling artifacts by Emily Phillips and Carolyn Frisa

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Care of Plastics: Malignant Plastics, R. Scott Williams

Care of Plastics: Malignant Plastics, R. Scott Williams Source: WAAC Newsletter, January 2002 Volume 24 Number 1 This article is an attempt to give readers a place to start when confronted with the problems particular to plastics. Only a few aspects of the care of plastics can be presented in a newsletter format. However, I […]

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Care of Plastics

Care of Plastics Source: Museum of Design in Plastics Plastics differ from each other in their care needs. The exact recipe of each plastic, including its range of additives, influences how it will age. Even the pigment used to colour an otherwise identical object can cause objects to age differently. That said, most plastics are […]

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POPART project – the Preservation of Pastic Artifacts in Museum Collections

POPART project – the Preservation of Pastic Artifacts in Museum Collections These pages gather a bulk of knowledge that is record of the latest conservation science and technology as applied to plastic works of art, gained during the POPART project – the Preservation Of Plastic ARTefacts in museum collections: a 42-month international research project part […]

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Care of Objects Made from Rubber and Plastic

Care of Objects Made from Rubber and Plastic Source: Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) Natural and synthetic rubber, and plastic deteriorate continuously. It is, therefore, important for custodians of collections to be aware that by properly controlling the agents of deterioration, the lifetime of these materials can be extended.

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Plastics and Modern Materials

Plastics and Modern Materials Source: Minnesota Historical Society Plastics are the most widely used modern material, and many different ones are available. Since many plastic items were considered disposable, they were not manufactured to endure.

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