Marking objects with pen and ink

Viewing 14 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #132291
      Becca DuBey
      Member

      The blak ink that I use to mark objects with their Object ID number smears when I apply the final coat of Acryloid B-72 in Aceton.  I use a dip pen to apply the number, wait for it to dry (24 hours) and yet is still smears.  What ink (brand and type) do you use to permanently mark objects?  Is there something better to use than B-72 for the final overcoat?

    • #132305

      I like to use B72 the most. The pen I tend to pair it with is “pigma micron 05” http://www.gaylord.com/adblock.asp?abid=16098&search_by=desc&search_for=micron%20pen&mpc=WW.  Typically I write the number on rice paper and use B72 to stick the rice paper to the object. I find that the number shows nicely doing this, and is less like to smear. However, I have not had any smear problems with this pen. Hope that helps!

    • #132304
      Wendi Murray
      Participant

      To get around this problem, we started using laser-printed labels a couple years ago with very good results. We print them on acid-free paper in the smallest readable font possible, cut to the edges of the text, and sandwich the label between coats of Acryloid B-72 with tweezers. No smudging and the label is always legible. I have attached a photo of why we started doing this – some of our archaeological collections were labeled with provenience info in ink that had started to fade. Eek!

    • #132303
      Wendi Murray
      Participant

      Here is the pic…

    • #132302
      Lois J Wolf
      Participant

      Wendi, I don’t see the pic. where is it?

    • #132301
      Wendi Murray
      Participant

      Sorry – had to compress the image file before it would let me attach!

    • #132300
      Lois J Wolf
      Participant

      Thanks!

    • #132299

      The picture is a very common occurrence in archaeological collections.  I would place money on the fact that they used a fine pointed sharpie and they was definitely no overcoat!  In archaeology, we have to label so much material that printing and applying tags would take far longer than applying the labels by pen and ink.  We use B-72 but have a thinner bottom coat and thicker top coat to keep from smearing the ink.  We have also found that the Millenium Zig pens have a “tougher” ink than the Pigma pens do.  I learned using crow quill pens and having a disposable pen is fantastic technology!

    • #132298
      Patricia Miller
      Participant

      I have heard that B-72 has acetone in it and that some pens also have acetone (such as Pigma). This is what causes the smearing. People seem to have success with the Identa-pen. I like this one because it has two sizes of points.
      Pat Miller

    • #132297

      Who makes the Identa-pen and has the ink been tested for color fastness?

    • #132296
      Patricia Miller
      Participant

      The Identi-pen is made by Sakura and is available in art supply shops. It was tested by Mariana Munyer and written up in an “How To” article for the Illinois Association of Museums (“How To…Mark Objects in Museum Collections, Part One: Barrier Coats, Pens, Inks, Paints.” Illinois Association of Museums. October, 1997, #17. Part Two (#18) covers tags, direct marking, and difficult materials.)

      Here is what she says about the Identi-pen: “This pen comes with two points (extra fine and fine). It writes well on acrylic resins, and does not smear when top coats are applied. The extra fine tip is better for marking purposes than the fine tip. Identi-pen is available from Gaylord Archival Products and from some art supply stores.”

      You can order the “How To…” articles from the Illinois Association of Museums for $2.16. http://www.state.il.us/hpa/iam/publications.html.

      Pat Miller

    • #132295

      Thanks.  I’ll check out the Illinois pubs

    • #132294
      Becca DuBey
      Member

      Thank you very much for the suggestion of printing the number and then attaching the paper to the object.  I have been experimenting with this method since you posted, and find that it works very, very well.  I even had to remove a  lable, and found it easily reversible.  The printed label is so much more legible.  I was trained before computer printers, and find this a much better solution.  I  have even attached it to fabric successfully.  I find that laying down a swatch of B-72, then waiting a second, applying the paper and another label works without discoloration of the paper.  Thank you so much, and going to look for the Identapen!

    • #132293
      Wendi Murray
      Participant

      Hi Becca,

      Some additional hints about that method – we use 16 lb paper, which is much thinner than regular copy paper, and we find that it adheres really well while still being reversible. Also, we print a lot of our labels sequentially, and sometimes need to assign hundreds of numbers for our archaeological collections. We can do this in a matter of seconds in Excel, which has a function that will autofill numbers in ascending or descending order. I know it sounds cumbersome to some, but the time and eye strain that it takes to cut them out really isn’t much more than it takes to write a legible accession number on a small object with a steady hand. Good luck!

      Wendi

    • #132292
      Sharon McCullar
      Participant

      I have had some trouble getting a paper label to stick to some objects – specifically the bottom surface of ceramics – I have tried it on the glazed and unglazed areas – these are crocks manufactured ca 1900s for food storage and also china place setting pieces (plates, cups, bowls, etc).

      I typically use the base coat-inked mark-top coat method on most materials that can accept such a method and have also found that sometimes my inked mark (even after 24 hour drying time) dissolves on contact with the top coat.  Sometimes the inked mark will “slide” and become illegible but not dissolve completely.  Am I trapping moisture between the layers of B-72?  This happens randomly.  I use a Rapid-o-graph pen and black Rapid -o- Graph india ink.  B-72 bottom coat and top coat.  I have also tried a B-72 base coat and a Soluvar lacquer top coat.

      Thanks to all who participate in this forum – lots of great advice!

Viewing 14 reply threads
  • The forum ‘C2C Community Archives – 2012 through 2014’ is closed to new topics and replies.