Creating a safe environment for our collection

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    • #133626
      Ellen Paul
      Participant

      With the construction of a new town hall, the Town of Warren, CT has offered the Warren Historical Society the opportunity to move its collection from a very insecure and damaging site to a larger and, at the moment, stripped location. Our Selectman is urging us to make decisions on flooring, wall covering and lighting within the limits of the town budget. If we don’t decide, the decisions will be made for us.
      We would be very grateful for guidance in the selection of wall covering and flooring that minimize off gasing of VOCs and light placement which takes into account display space; research areas and staff work areas as well as lighting which minimizes UV radiation.
      Sincere thanks for any and all help.

    • #133641
      Lauren Stara
      Member

      I have had success with Interface carpeting and Marmoleum flooring. Be aware, however: if you use Marmoleum, you MUST clean it according to their directions or you will ruin the finish.

      Good luck!
      Lauren Stara
      Lstara Consulting
      Space planning and building consulting for libraries, museums and archives

    • #133640
      Ellen Paul
      Participant

      Thank you, Lauren. The cleaning thing might be a problem, but I will check with distributors.

    • #133639
      Lauren Stara
      Member

      No problem. The Interface carpet squares are great & don’t need special cleaning.

    • #133638

      Hi Ellen – In the collection areas you will definitely NOT want to use carpet. It’s fine in public areas, but in your storage areas, it serves as habitat for pests, especially if not kept immaculate! Good luck with the project and please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any further questions. I’m just in Monroe, CT and would be interested in speaking with you further about the project.

    • #133637
      Michael Bell
      Member

      Use bare concrete in your storage areas. It is easier to keep clean and does not present the problems that a painted surface does.

    • #133636

      Hi Michael – What problems have you had with painted surfaces? If you use regular cement/concrete paint, then yes you can have problems. You need to use an epoxy (I’m digging in my notes to get the name of what I’ve used successfully.) Bare concrete generates WAY too much dust for collections storage areas in my opinion. Properly cured epoxy paint wears well, is easy to clean and looks “neat and tidy”. Would love to hear what paints you’ve used and the problems you’ve had. :-)

    • #133635

      Thanks for this great question Ellen–I hope you can tune into the free online chat this Wednesday, Feb. 8 at 2:30 pm EST about collections moves. The Thursday, Feb. 23, 1:00 pm EST chat about “Making the Most of the Storage You Have” may also address these issues.

      The National Park Service Museum Handbook Vol. 2, Chapter 7 has some useful guidelines that include not only flooring and paint choices, but also lighting, electrical systems, and other issues you should consider. See
      http://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/MHI/CHAP7.pdf

      Two specific points from page 7:5 are:
      • Seal concrete floors with a vapor-proof epoxy or urethane paint or
      cover with dust impervious commercial composition, quarry or ceramic
      tiles. Use dust impervious commercial composition, quarry or ceramic
      tiles as a floor finish over plywood sub floor sheathing.
      • Paint walls and ceiling with paint containing titanium dioxide pigment. Paint with titanium dioxide will absorb ultraviolet radiation emitted by ambient or artificial lighting.

    • #133634

      Thanks for this great question Ellen–I hope you can tune into the free online chat this Wednesday, Feb. 8 at 2:30 pm EST about collections moves. The Thursday, Feb. 23, 1:00 pm EST chat about “Making the Most of the Storage You Have” may also address these issues.

      The National Park Service Museum Handbook Vol. 2, Chapter 7 has some useful guidelines that include not only flooring and paint choices, but also lighting, electrical systems, and other issues you should consider. See
      http://www.nps.gov/museum/publications/MHI/CHAP7.pdf

      Two specific points from page 7:5 are:
      • Seal concrete floors with a vapor-proof epoxy or urethane paint or
      cover with dust impervious commercial composition, quarry or ceramic
      tiles. Use dust impervious commercial composition, quarry or ceramic
      tiles as a floor finish over plywood sub floor sheathing.
      • Paint walls and ceiling with paint containing titanium dioxide pigment. Paint with titanium dioxide will absorb ultraviolet radiation emitted by ambient or artificial lighting.

    • #133633
      Ellen Paul
      Participant

      Thank you, Kristen. These are great tips. I wish I could participate in the online chat on Wednesday, but I’ll be working at my day job. Will it be recorded?

    • #133632

      Yes, it will be recorded and posted on the C2C Online Community homepage and under “Meeting Room” tab within a day or two of the event.

    • #133631

      Yes, it will be recorded and posted on the C2C Online Community homepage and under “Meeting Room” tab within a day or two of the event.

    • #133630

      Lighting specifications require you to consider the intended use of the space. The ninth edition of Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings by Stein and Reynolds recommend “in stack areas, the required vertical surface illumination is best supplied by one of the special fluorescent units designed for this purpose. These are mounted between the racks and no higher than 24 in above them for best results.” Fixture characteristics for fluorescent units include single-rapid start or high output lamp with special lens or parabolic reflector. The lamps should have a colour rendering index (CRI) as close to 100 as possible and they should be color balanced for the human eye.
      If you opt to use concrete, as is commonly recommended, in place of carpet, you should ensure that it is sealed to avoid introducing alkaline particulate matter into the storage areas. The surface of the concrete should be allowed to cure for at least 4 weeks “to allow optimum formation of hydrated compounds and a decrease in the pH.” (CCI Tech Bulletin 21) All cracks and holes should be repaired before coating.
      The new concrete will first need to be treated with muriatic acid (20-30% solution of hydrochloric acid) so that the concrete sealant will adhere. Epoxy coatings are the preferred coating.

    • #133629
      Michael Bell
      Member

      When our building was under construction the floors in all the basement areas where the collections storage is was painted with a dull gray paint. Anything left in contact with it for more than a few days will literally stick to it. I have had to kick my camera tripod loose from it, and I mean kick it. That said, it would be prohibitively costly to have it removed.

    • #133628
      Michael Bell
      Member

      I did not know about the epoxy for a floor sealant, and we were not consulted before the floors were painted.

    • #133627

      UGH…that stinks! The epoxy floor coating that I used, upon recommendation of Wendy Jessup, Wendy Jessup & Associates (who is EXCELLENT!!) is General Polymer’s 3505S Special Epoxy Floor Coating. Apparently it was formulated in partnership between the manufacturer and the National Archives. (See http://www.archives.gov/preservation/technical/tip13.pdf ).

      Sorry to hear you had such problems Michael – that does sound like it really stinks!!

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