Re: Emergency Preparedness Plans During Construction

#132913

OSHA has a standard about what they call “Hot work.” (OSHA Standard 1910.252, on “Welding, Cutting, and Brazing,”)

The idea is that any time hot tools are being used, there has to be someone whose job it is to stay and watch as long as the tools are hot. Debris has to be cleared well away from the hot site, and the person who watches has to be authorized to stop the job (without financial penalties) if they think something dangerous is happening.

Another issue is that detectors are often taken off line during construction in order not to get them messed up. If smoke detectors are not feasible, then heat-rise detectors should be used, but – bottom line – there should be nothing hot that is not supervised.

Good sources of info:
“Fire Risk Assessment” Jean Tetrault, Journal of the Canadian Association for Conservation, vol 33, 2008, 3-21

NFPA 909: Code for the Protection of Cultural Resource Properties– Museum, Libraries, and Places of Worship NFPA, Quincy, MA, 2005 (Latest edition)

Fire Safety Self-Inspection Form For Cultural Institutions and Fire Protection in Cultural Institutions J. Andrew Wilson, from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)www.archives.gov/preservation/emergency-prep/fire-index.html

Fire Safety Self-Inspection Form For Cultural Institutions and Fire Protection in Cultural Institutions, J. Andrew Wilson, from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) http://www.archives.gov/preservation/emergency-prep/fire-index.html